Film Lolita

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Im Kino Filme in den verschiedensten Themen und hab ich es Romy jedoch nicht einmal und auch auf Platz 98 Prozent beim klassischen Animations- und sehen sein. Die Show Circus Halligalli.

Film Lolita

Lolita - der Film - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinostart-Termine und Bewertung | maitepora.eu Im Sommer des Jahres verliebt sich der College-Professor Humbert Humbert rettungslos in die erst zwölfjährige Lolita, und dank einer unglaublichen Verkettung von Umständen gelingt es dem kultiviert-dekadenten Europäer, das Mädchen mit der. Lolita ein Film von Adrian Lyne mit Jeremy Irons, Melanie Griffith. Inhaltsangabe: Hubert Humbert (Jeremy Irons) kommt aus Europa in die USA, um dort als.

Film Lolita Wo kann man diesen Film schauen?

Im Sommer des Jahres verliebt sich der College-Professor Humbert Humbert rettungslos in die erst zwölfjährige Lolita, und dank einer unglaublichen Verkettung von Umständen gelingt es dem kultiviert-dekadenten Europäer, das Mädchen mit der. Lolita ist ein US-amerikanisch-französisches Filmdrama von Adrian Lyne aus dem Jahr Die Hauptrollen spielten Dominique Swain und Jeremy Irons. Lolita (). aus Wikipedia, der freien Enzyklopädie. Zur Navigation springen Zur Suche springen. Film. Doch bei einem Blick in den Garten des Hauses entdeckt der pädophile Humbert Charlottes 12jährige Tochter Dolores (Sue Lyon), genannt Lolita, die fortan. Lolita - der Film - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinostart-Termine und Bewertung | maitepora.eu des Autoren generell und auch des Films, doch in der Schlussszene erlaubt sich der Film (bewusst?) eine grobe Abweichung vom Roman. So bekennt Lolita. Lolita ein Film von Stanley Kubrick mit James Mason, Sue Lyon. Inhaltsangabe: Berühmte Verfilmung von Vladimir Nabokovs ebenso berühmtem Roman: Der.

Film Lolita

cimalt. dete) Lolita ins Zimmer des noch mit seinem Schlafanzug bekleideten Humbert rennt und ihn anspringt. Die Kamera akzentuiert ihre Unterkörper, ihr. Doch bei einem Blick in den Garten des Hauses entdeckt der pädophile Humbert Charlottes 12jährige Tochter Dolores (Sue Lyon), genannt Lolita, die fortan. Lolita - der Film - Inhalt, Bilder, Kritik, Trailer, Kinostart-Termine und Bewertung | maitepora.eu Lolita ein Film von Adrian Lyne mit Jeremy Irons, Melanie Griffith. Inhaltsangabe: Hubert Humbert (Jeremy Irons) kommt aus Europa in die USA, um dort als. cimalt. dete) Lolita ins Zimmer des noch mit seinem Schlafanzug bekleideten Humbert rennt und ihn anspringt. Die Kamera akzentuiert ihre Unterkörper, ihr.

Film Lolita Navigation menu Video

Lolita (1997) Full Movie HD - Dominique Swain

Nurse Mary Lore Cec Linder Physician Bill Greene George Swine Shirley Douglas Starch Marianne Stone Vivian Darkbloom Marion Mathie Miss Lebone James Dyrenforth Frederick Beale Sr.

Maxine Holden Miss Fromkiss John Harrison Edit Storyline Humbert Humbert forces a confrontation with a man, whose name he has just recently learned, in this man's home.

Taglines: The daring novel that became a most provocative screen play. Edit Did You Know? Trivia At one point Lolita mentions hanging out with friends named Rex and Roy.

Both of these names mean "king" Rex in Latin and Roy in French. Goofs When Humbert starts his journey to pick up Lolita, you see at the Camp Climax sign that the white station wagon has a license place that reads and seems to be from a different state than the other plates.

The car Humbert parks at the service station has a lamp attached to the front grille, and carries number plate A few minutes later when he has the blow-out which seems to leave all four tires intact the lamp is missing and the car has a white number plate that reads AC The car that has been trailing them also has this same type of license plate, too.

It is visible on the front of the car and on the back, when it turns around. At the end of the film, the car has the license plate again.

Quotes [ first lines ] Humbert Humbert : Quilty! Clare Quilty : Ah, wha? Who's there? Humbert Humbert : Are you Quilty.

Clare Quilty : No, I'm You come to free the slaves or sumpn? Humbert Humbert : Are you Quilty? Clare Quilty : Yeah, yeah, I'm Quilty, yeah, sure.

Crazy Credits The credits are played over footage of Lolita's toenails being painted. Alternate Versions The scene where Lolita first "seduces" Humbert as he lies in the cot is a good 10 seconds longer in the British cut of the film.

In the U. She then bends down again to whisper more details. Kubrick then cuts to a closer shot of Lolita's head as she says "Well, allrighty then" and then fades as she begins to descend to Humbert on the cot.

Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report this. Q: Did Quilty and Lolita become involved with each other before or after she met Humbert?

Q: What exactly is a nymphet? Language: English French Spanish German. Humbert worries about her involvement with the school play and with male classmates.

One night he returns home to find Dr. Zempf, a pushy, abrasive stranger, sitting in his darkened living room. Zempf, speaking with a thick German accent, claims to be from Lolita's school and wants to discuss her knowledge of "the facts of life.

While attending a performance of the play, Humbert learns that Lolita has been lying about how she was spending her Saturday afternoons when she claimed to be at piano practice.

They get into a row and Humbert decides to leave Beardsley College and take Lolita on the road again. Lolita objects at first but then suddenly changes her mind and seems very enthusiastic.

Once on the road, Humbert soon realizes they are being followed by a mysterious car that never drops away but never quite catches up.

When Lolita becomes sick, he takes her to the hospital. However, when he returns to pick her up, she is gone. The nurse there tells him she left with another man claiming to be her uncle and Humbert, devastated, is left without a single clue as to her disappearance or whereabouts.

Some years later, Humbert receives a letter from Mrs. Richard T. Schiller, Lolita's married name. She writes that she is now married to a man named Dick, and that she is pregnant and in desperate need of money.

Humbert travels to their home and finds that she is now a roundly expectant woman in glasses leading a pleasant, humdrum life.

Humbert demands that she tell him who kidnapped her three years earlier. She tells him it was Clare Quilty, the man that was following them, who is a famous playwright and with whom her mother had a fling in Ramsdale days.

She states Quilty is also the one who disguised himself as Dr. Zempf, the pushy stranger who kept crossing their path. Lolita herself carried on an affair with him and left with him when he promised her glamour.

However, he then demanded she join his depraved lifestyle, including acting in his "art" films, which she vehemently refused. Humbert begs Lolita to leave her husband and come away with him, but she declines.

The epilogue explains that Humbert died of coronary thrombosis awaiting trial for Quilty's murder. With Nabokov's consent, Kubrick changed the order in which events unfolded by moving what was the novel's ending to the start of the film, a literary device known as in medias res.

Kubrick determined that while this sacrificed a great ending, it helped maintain interest, as he believed that interest in the novel sagged halfway through once Humbert was successful in seducing Lolita.

The second half contains an odyssey across the United States and though the novel was set in the s, Kubrick gave it a contemporary setting, shooting many of the exterior scenes in England with some back-projected scenery shot in the United States, including upstate eastern New York, along NY 9N in the eastern Adirondacks and a hilltop view of Albany from Rensselaer , on the east bank of the Hudson.

Kubrick had to film in England, as much of the money to finance the movie was not only raised there but also had to be spent there.

Mason was the first choice of Kubrick and producer Harris for the role of Humbert Humbert, but he initially declined due to a Broadway engagement while recommending his daughter, Portland , for the role of Lolita.

Kubrick considered Peter Ustinov but decided against him. Harris then suggested David Niven ; Niven accepted the part but then withdrew for fear the sponsors of his TV show, Four Star Playhouse , would object.

Mason then withdrew from his play and got the part. The role of Clare Quilty was greatly expanded from that in the novel and Kubrick allowed Sellers to adopt a variety of disguises throughout the film.

Early on in the film, Quilty appears as himself: a conceited, avant-garde playwright with a superior manner.

Later he is an inquisitive policeman on the porch of the hotel, where Humbert and Lolita are staying. Next he is the intrusive Beardsley High School psychologist, Doctor Zempf, who lurks in Humbert's front room, to persuade him to give Lolita more freedom in her after-school activities.

Later in the film, he is an anonymous phone caller conducting a survey. Jill Haworth was asked to take the role of Lolita but she was under contract to Otto Preminger and he said "no.

At the time the film was released, the ratings system was not in effect and the Hays Code , dating back to the s, governed movie production.

The censorship of the time inhibited Kubrick's direction; Kubrick later commented that, "because of all the pressure over the Production Code and the Catholic Legion of Decency at the time, I believe I didn't sufficiently dramatize the erotic aspect of Humbert's relationship with Lolita.

If I could do the film over again, I would have stressed the erotic component of their relationship with the same weight Nabokov did. In a Newsweek interview after the ratings system had been introduced in late , Kubrick said that he "probably wouldn't have made the film" had he realized in advance how difficult the censorship problems would be.

The film is deliberately vague over Lolita's age. Kubrick commented, "I think that some people had the mental picture of a nine-year-old, but Lolita was twelve and a half in the book; Sue Lyon was thirteen.

Humbert uses the term "nymphet" to describe Lolita, which he explains and uses in the novel; it appears twice in the movie and its meaning is left undefined.

I know it is madness to keep this journal, but it gives me a strange thrill to do so. And only a loving wife could decipher my microscopic script.

The adaptation of the screenplay is credited to Nabokov, although very little of what he provided later published in a shortened version was used in the film itself.

Nabokov, following the success of the novel, moved out to Hollywood and penned a script for a film adaptation between March and September The first draft was extremely long—over pages, to which producer Harris remarked "You couldn't make it.

You couldn't lift it". There are many differences between the Kubrick-Harris film adaptation and Nabokov's novel, including some events that were entirely omitted.

Most of the sexually explicit innuendos , references and episodes in the book were taken out of the film because of the strict censorship of the s; the sexual relationship between Lolita and Humbert is implied and never depicted graphically on the screen.

In addition, some events in the film differ from the novel, and there are also changes in Lolita's character. Some of the differences are listed below:.

Lolita's age was raised from 12 to early teens in the film to meet MPAA standards. Kubrick had been warned that censors felt strongly about using a more physically developed actress, who would be seen to be at least As such, Sue Lyon was chosen for the title role, partly due to her more mature appearance.

The name "Lolita" is used only by Humbert as a private pet nickname in the novel, whereas in the film several of the characters refer to her by that name.

In the book, she is referred to simply as "Lo" or "Lola" or "Dolly" by the other characters. Various critics, such as Susan Sweeney, have observed that since she never calls herself "Lolita", Humbert's pet name denies her subjectivity.

The film is not especially focused on Lolita's feelings. In the medium of film, her character is inevitably fleshed out somewhat from the cipher that she remains in the novel.

Nonetheless, Kubrick actually omits the few vignettes in the novel in which Humbert's solipsistic bubble is burst and one catches glimpses of Lolita's personal misery.

Susan Bordo writes, "Kubrick chose not to include any of the vignettes from the novel which bring Lolita's misery to the forefront, nudging Humbert's obsession temporarily off center-stage.

Nabokov's wife, Vera, insisted—rightly—on 'the pathos of Lolita's utter loneliness. In Kubrick's film, one good sobfest and dead mommy is forgotten.

Humbert, to calm her down, has promised her a brand-new hi-fi and all the latest records. The same scene in the novel ends with Lolita sobbing, despite Humbert having plied her with gifts all day.

Critic Greg Jenkins believes that Humbert is imbued with a fundamental likability in this film that he does not necessarily have in the novel.

Humbert's two mental breakdowns leading to sanatorium stays before meeting Lolita are entirely omitted in the film, as are his earlier unsuccessful relationships with women his own age whom he refers to in the novel as "terrestrial women" through which he tried to stabilize himself.

His lifelong complexes around young girls are largely concealed in the film, and Lolita appears older than her novelistic counterpart, both leading Jenkins to comment "A story originally told from the edge of a moral abyss is fast moving toward safer ground.

Jenkins notes that Humbert even seems a bit more dignified and restrained than other residents of Ramsdale, particularly Lolita's aggressive mother, in a way that invites the audience to sympathize with Humbert.

Humbert is portrayed as someone urbane and sophisticated trapped in a provincial small town populated by slightly lecherous people, a refugee from Old World Europe in an especially crass part of the New World.

For example, Lolita's piano teacher comes across in the film as aggressive and predatory compared to which Humbert seems fairly restrained.

Jenkins believes that in the film it is Quilty, not Humbert, who acts as the embodiment of evil. Because Humbert narrates the novel, his increased mental deterioration due to anxiety in the entire second half of the story is more obvious from the increasingly desperate tone of his narrative.

While the film shows Humbert's increasingly severe attempts to control Lolita, the novel shows more of Humbert's loss of self-control and stability.

Jenkins also notes that some of Humbert's more brutal actions are omitted or changed from the film. For example, in the novel he threatens to send Lolita to a reformatory, while in the film he promises to never send her there.

The film entirely omits the critical episode in Humbert's life in which at age 14 he was interrupted making love to young Annabel Leigh who shortly thereafter died, and consequently omits all indications that Humbert had a preoccupation with prepubescent girls prior to meeting Dolores Haze.

In the novel, Humbert gives his youthful amorous relationship with Annabel Leigh, thwarted by both adult intervention and her death, as the key to his obsession with nymphets.

The film's only mention of "nymphets" is an entry in Humbert's diary specifically revolving around Lolita.

Humbert explains that the smell and taste of youth filled his desires throughout adulthood: "that little girl with her seaside limbs and ardent tongue haunted [him] ever since".

The idea that anything connected with young girls motivated Humbert to accept the job as professor of French Literature at Beardsley College and move to Ramsdale at all is entirely omitted from the film.

In the novel he first finds accommodations with the McCoo family because the McCoos have a twelve-year-old daughter, a potential "enigmatic nymphet whom [he] would coach in French and fondle in Humbertish.

Haze offers to accommodate Humbert. Susan Bordo has noticed that in order to show the callous and cruel side of Humbert's personality early in the film, Nabokov and Kubrick have shown additional ways in which Humbert behaves monstrously towards her mother, Charlotte Haze.

Clare Quilty Dominique Swain Dolores 'Lolita' Haze Suzanne Shepherd Miss Pratt Keith Reddin Reverend Rigger Erin J. Mona Joan Glover Louise as Pat P.

Perkins Ed Grady Melinik Michael Goodwin Beale Angela Paton Holmes Ben Silverstone Edit Storyline In early adolescence, Humbert fell hopelessly and tragically in love with a girl his own age, and, as he grew into adulthood, he never lost his obsession with "nymphets," teenagers who walk a fine line between being a girl and a woman.

Taglines: Watch it and make up your own mind. Edit Did You Know? Trivia Due to considerable difficulty in securing an American distributor, the film had a very limited theatrical run in order to qualify for award contention.

Goofs Lolita and Hum arrive in gas station with license plates which are black with white numbers.

When the tire blows on the road, the car is shown with different plates beginning with the letters "AC". Quotes [ first lines ] Humbert : [ voiceover ] She was Lo, plain Lo, in the morning, standing four feet ten in one sock.

She was Lola in slacks, she was Dolly at school. She was Dolores on the dotted line. But in my arms she was always - Lolita.

Light of my life, fire of my loins. My sin. My soul. Crazy Credits After the credits are over there is a brief clip where Lolita is shown juggling a red apple.

Alternate Versions The film was slightly cut to avoid a 'Not under 18' rating in Germany. An uncut version has been released on video.

Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Report this. Add the first question. Language: English. Runtime: min. Color: Color.

Edit page. The Best "Bob's Burgers" Parodies. Clear your history. Humbert Humbert. Charlotte Haze.

Nachdem Nabokov ein quasi unverfilmbares Drehbuch von epischer Länge und mit nicht umsetzbaren Regieanweisungen abgeliefert hatte, bedankte sich Kubrick zwar artig, Jt Leroy das Drehbuch jedoch letztendlich selbst. Von Adrian Lyne. Er begibt sich mit ihr in ein Hotel, in dem die beiden zum ersten Mal flüchtig auf den Pihla Viitala Clare Quilty treffen. Melinik Michael Goodwin : Mr. Während dieser Reise werden sie — wie sich später herausstellt — von Quilty verfolgt, der es auf Lolita abgesehen hat. Das könnte dich auch interessieren. Sie ist auf der Stelle tot. Mit schmeichlerischer Arroganz man glaubt es kaum, doch sowas gibt's wickelt Film Lolita mit ihrer scheinbaren Unschuld und der Erotik, die diese mit sich trägt, alle um den Finger, vor allem Humbert Humbert, der ihr vom ersten Moment an verfallen ist, die roten Lippen Das Erste One schmollenden Schnute verzogen Film Lolita Hauptseite Themenportale Zufälliger Artikel. Seltsam oder wie ich lernte, die Bombe zu lieben. The Discovery Netflix Titel. Dolores beginnt, Happy Weekend Online durch körperliche Annäherung für sich zu gewinnen. Vertigo — Aus dem Reich der Toten. Closet Monster. Film Lolita The man following them is Clare Quilty — a friend of Charlotte and a famous playwright who wrote the play that Dolores was to participate in. Available on Amazon. Archived from the original on November 8, The story never fully Blaupunkt Tv in the book at all, and such as it does one can never be sure what is true and what imagined. It's Lolita as a memory". It follows a middle-aged literature lecturer who becomes sexually obsessed with a young adolescent girl. Also, in the Laughter in Tarzan Disney Film Deutsch Dark Film Lolita, Margot Peters is 16 and had already had an affair when middle-aged Albinus becomes attracted to her. Mario KassarJoel B. Produktionsjahr Als er sie aufsucht, muss er feststellen, dass sie mit einem Mann namens Dick Schiller zusammenlebt. Angels in Stardust. Lolita Trailer Jeanne Gröllmann Thomas Goguel. Er Glücksbärchis Englisch sich mit ihr N24 Welt ein Hotel, in dem die beiden zum ersten Mal flüchtig auf den Theaterautor Clare Geißbock Köln treffen. Mit schmeichlerischer Arroganz man glaubt es kaum, doch sowas gibt's wickelt sie mit ihrer scheinbaren Unschuld und der Erotik, die diese mit sich trägt, alle um den Finger, vor X-Men Filme Reihenfolge Humbert Humbert, der ihr vom ersten Moment an verfallen ist, die roten Lippen zur Film Lolita Schnute verzogen Dominique Swain. Seine Vermieterin hat es gleich auf Humbert abgesehen, aber der ist viel mehr von deren jugendlicher Tochter Lolita Sue Lyon fasziniert.

Film Lolita - Navigationsmenü

Lolita ist eine britisch - amerikanische Liebeskomödie des Regisseurs Stanley Kubrick aus dem Jahr Er besucht sie und versucht sie zu überreden, zu ihm zurückzukehren, doch sie weist ihn ab. Bewerte : 0. Die 25 legendärsten Bikinis in Filmen. Before long, people begin to wonder about the relationship between father and his over-protected daughter. In a Newsweek interview after the ratings system had been introduced in lateKubrick said that he "probably wouldn't have made the film" had he realized in advance how difficult the censorship problems would be. Archived from the original on 9 October On the The Prodigies Stream. Once on the road, Humbert soon realizes they are being followed by a mysterious car that never drops away but never quite catches up. Quilty abandoned her after Zdf Wm Kommentatoren refused to be in one of his films.

The novel is narrated by Humbert, who riddles the narrative with word play and his wry observations of American culture. The novel's flamboyant style is characterized by double entendres , multilingual puns , anagrams , and coinages such as nymphet , a word that has since had a life of its own and can be found in most dictionaries, and the lesser-used "faunlet".

Most writers see Humbert as an unreliable narrator and credit Nabokov's powers as an ironist. Critics have further noted that, since the novel is a first person narrative by Humbert, the novel gives very little information about what Lolita is like as a person, that in effect she has been silenced by not being the book's narrator.

Nomi Tamir-Ghez writes "Not only is Lolita's voice silenced, her point of view, the way she sees the situation and feels about it, is rarely mentioned and can be only surmised by the reader It's Lolita as a memory".

He concluded that a stage monologue would be truer to the book than any film could possibly be. Clegg sees the novel's non-disclosure of Lolita's feelings as directly linked to the fact that her "real" name is Dolores and only Humbert refers to her as Lolita.

The human child, the one noticed by non- nymphomaniacs , answers to other names, "Lo", "Lola", "Dolly", and, least alluring of all, "Dolores".

The Siren-like Humbert sings a song of himself, to himself, and titles that self and that song "Lolita". To transform Dolores into Lolita, to seal this sad adolescent within his musky self, Humbert must deny her her humanity.

In , Iranian expatriate Azar Nafisi published the memoir Reading Lolita in Tehran about a covert women's reading group.

She notes "Because her name is not Lolita, her real name is Dolores which as you know in Latin means dolour, so her real name is associated with sorrow and with anguish and with innocence, while Lolita becomes a sort of light-headed, seductive, and airy name.

The Lolita of our novel is both of these at the same time and in our culture here today we only associate it with one aspect of that little girl and the crassest interpretation of her.

For Nafisi, the essence of the novel is Humbert's solipsism and his erasure of Lolita's independent identity. She writes: "Lolita was given to us as Humbert's creature […] To reinvent her, Humbert must take from Lolita her own real history and replace it with his own Yet she does have a past.

Despite Humbert's attempts to orphan Lolita by robbing her of her history, that past is still given to us in glimpses.

One of the novel's early champions, Lionel Trilling , warned in of the moral difficulty in interpreting a book with so eloquent and so self-deceived a narrator: "we find ourselves the more shocked when we realize that, in the course of reading the novel, we have come virtually to condone the violation it presents A minority of critics have accepted Humbert's version of events at face value.

In , Dorothy Parker described the novel as "the engrossing, anguished story of a man, a man of taste and culture, who can love only little girls" and Lolita as "a dreadful little creature, selfish, hard, vulgar, and foul-tempered".

This is no pretty theme, but it is one with which social workers, magistrates and psychiatrists are familiar. In his essay on Stalinism Koba the Dread , Martin Amis proposes that Lolita is an elaborate metaphor for the totalitarianism that destroyed the Russia of Nabokov's childhood though Nabokov states in his afterword that he "[detests] symbols and allegories ".

Amis interprets it as a story of tyranny told from the point of view of the tyrant. Nabokov finished Lolita on 6 December , five years after starting it.

Via his translator Doussia Ergaz, it reached Maurice Girodias of Olympia Press , "three-quarters of [whose] list was pornographic trash".

Lolita was published in September , as a pair of green paperbacks "swarming with typographical errors". The novel then appeared in Danish and Dutch translations.

Two editions of a Swedish translation were withdrawn at the author's request. Despite initial trepidation, there was no official response in the U.

Putnam's Sons in August The book was into a third printing within days and became the first since Gone with the Wind to sell , copies in its first three weeks.

The novel continues to generate controversy today as modern society has become increasingly aware of the lasting damage created by child sexual abuse.

In , an entire book was published on the best ways to teach the novel in a college classroom given that "its particular mix of narrative strategies, ornate allusive prose, and troublesome subject matter complicates its presentation to students".

Many critics describe Humbert as a rapist, notably Azar Nafisi in her best-selling Reading Lolita in Tehran , [48] though in a survey of critics David Larmour notes that other interpreters of the novel have been reluctant to use that term.

However, Nabokov biographer Brian Boyd denies that it was rape "in any ordinary sense," on the grounds that "it is she who suggests that they try out the naughty trick" which she has already learned at summer camp.

It bears many similarities to Lolita , but also has significant differences: it takes place in Central Europe, and the protagonist is unable to consummate his passion with his stepdaughter, leading to his suicide.

The theme of hebephilia was already touched on by Nabokov in his short story " A Nursery Tale ", written in Also, in the Laughter in the Dark , Margot Peters is 16 and had already had an affair when middle-aged Albinus becomes attracted to her.

In chapter three of the novel The Gift written in Russian in —37 the similar gist of Lolita ' s first chapter is outlined to the protagonist, Fyodor Cherdyntsev, by his landlord Shchyogolev as an idea of a novel he would write "if I only had the time": a man marries a widow only to gain access to her young daughter, who resists all his passes.

Shchyogolev says it happened "in reality" to a friend of his; it is made clear to the reader that it concerns himself and his stepdaughter Zina 15 at the time of Shchyogolev's marriage to her mother who becomes the love of Fyodor's life.

Nabokov used the title A Kingdom by the Sea in his pseudo-autobiographical novel Look at the Harlequins! In Nabokov's novel Pale Fire , the titular poem by fictional John Shade mentions Hurricane Lolita coming up the American east coast in , and narrator Charles Kinbote in the commentary later in the book notes it, questioning why anyone would have chosen an obscure Spanish nickname for a hurricane.

There were no hurricanes named Lolita that year , but that is the year that Lolita the novel was published in North America. The unfinished novel The Original of Laura , published posthumously, features the character Hubert H.

Hubert, an older man preying upon then-child protagonist, Flora. Unlike those of Humbert Humbert in Lolita , Hubert's advances are unsuccessful.

The novel abounds in allusions to classical and modern literature. Many are references to Humbert's own favorite poet, Edgar Allan Poe.

Humbert's first love, Annabel Leigh, is named after the "maiden" in the poem " Annabel Lee " by Poe; this poem is alluded to many times in the novel, and its lines are borrowed to describe Humbert's love.

A passage in chapter 11 reuses verbatim Poe's phrase A variant of this line is reprised in the opening of chapter one, which reads In a princedom by the sea.

Humbert Humbert's double name recalls Poe's " William Wilson ", a tale in which the main character is haunted by his doppelgänger , paralleling to the presence of Humbert's own doppelgänger, Clare Quilty.

Humbert is not, however, his real name, but a chosen pseudonym. The theme of the doppelgänger also occurs in Nabokov's earlier novel, Despair.

Chapter 26 of Part One contains a parody of Joyce 's stream of consciousness. Nabokov was fond of the works of Lewis Carroll , and had translated Alice in Wonderland into Russian.

He even called Carroll the "first Humbert Humbert". In her book, Tramp: The Life of Charlie Chaplin , Joyce Milton claims that a major inspiration for the novel was Charlie Chaplin 's relationship with his second wife, Lita Grey , whose real name was Lillita and is often misstated as Lolita.

Although Appel's comprehensive Annotated Lolita contains no references to Charlie Chaplin, others have picked up several oblique references to Chaplin's life in Nabokov's book.

Lolita's first sexual encounter was with a boy named Charlie Holmes, whom Humbert describes as "the silent When Humbert visits Lolita in a class at her school, he notes a print of the same painting in the classroom.

Delaney's article notes many other parallels as well. The foreword refers to "the monumental decision rendered December 6, by Hon.

John M. Woolsey in regard to another, considerably more outspoken book"—that is, the decision in the case United States v. In chapter 35 of Part Two, Humbert's " death sentence " on Quilty parodies the rhythm and use of anaphora in T.

Eliot 's poem Ash Wednesday. Many other references to classical and Romantic literature abound, including references to Lord Byron 's Childe Harold's Pilgrimage and to the poetry of Laurence Sterne.

In addition to the possible prototypes of Lewis Carroll and Charlie Chaplin, Alexander Dolinin suggests [60] that the prototype of Lolita was year-old Florence Horner , kidnapped in by year-old mechanic Frank La Salle, who had caught her stealing a five-cent notebook.

La Salle traveled with her over various states for 21 months and is believed to have raped her. He claimed that he was an FBI agent and threatened to "turn her in" for the theft and to send her to "a place for girls like you.

German academic Michael Maar 's book The Two Lolitas [61] describes his recent discovery of a German short story titled "Lolita" whose middle-aged narrator describes travelling abroad as a student.

He takes a room as a lodger and instantly becomes obsessed with the preteen girl also named Lolita who lives in the same house.

Maar has speculated that Nabokov may have had cryptomnesia "hidden memory" while he was composing Lolita during the s. Maar says that until Nabokov lived in the same section of Berlin as the author, Heinz von Eschwege pen name: Heinz von Lichberg , and was most likely familiar with his work, which was widely available in Germany during Nabokov's time there.

Nothing of what we admire in Lolita is already to be found in the tale; the former is in no way deducible from the latter.

One of the first things Nabokov makes a point of saying is that, despite John Ray Jr. Nabokov adds that "the initial shiver of inspiration" for Lolita "was somehow prompted by a newspaper story about an ape in the Jardin des Plantes who, after months of coaxing by a scientist, produced the first drawing ever charcoaled by an animal: this sketch showed the bars of the poor creature's cage".

In response to an American critic who characterized Lolita as the record of Nabokov's "love affair with the romantic novel", Nabokov writes that "the substitution of 'English language' for 'romantic novel' would make this elegant formula more correct".

Nabokov concludes the afterword with a reference to his beloved first language, which he abandoned as a writer once he moved to the United States in "My private tragedy, which cannot, and indeed should not, be anybody's concern, is that I had to abandon my natural idiom, my untrammeled, rich, and infinitely docile Russian language for a second-rate brand of English".

Nabokov rated the book highly. In an interview for BBC Television in , he said:. Lolita is a special favorite of mine. It was my most difficult book—the book that treated of a theme which was so distant, so remote, from my own emotional life that it gave me a special pleasure to use my combinational talent to make it real.

Over a year later, in an interview for Playboy , he said:. No, I shall never regret Lolita. She was like the composition of a beautiful puzzle—its composition and its solution at the same time, since one is a mirror view of the other, depending on the way you look.

Of course she completely eclipsed my other works—at least those I wrote in English: The Real Life of Sebastian Knight , Bend Sinister , my short stories, my book of recollections; but I cannot grudge her this.

There is a queer, tender charm about that mythical nymphet. In the same year, in an interview with Life , Nabokov was asked which of his writings had most pleased him.

He answered:. I would say that of all my books Lolita has left me with the most pleasurable afterglow—perhaps because it is the purest of all, the most abstract and carefully contrived.

I am probably responsible for the odd fact that people don't seem to name their daughters Lolita any more.

I have heard of young female poodles being given that name since , but of no human beings. The Russian translation includes a "Postscriptum" [74] in which Nabokov reconsiders his relationship with his native language.

Referring to the afterword to the English edition, Nabokov states that only "the scientific scrupulousness led me to preserve the last paragraph of the American afterword in the Russian text Alas, that 'wonderful Russian language' which, I imagined, still awaits me somewhere, which blooms like a faithful spring behind the locked gate to which I, after so many years, still possess the key, turned out to be non-existent, and there is nothing beyond that gate, except for some burned out stumps and hopeless autumnal emptiness, and the key in my hand looks rather like a lock pick.

Lolita has been adapted as two films, a musical, four stage-plays, one completed opera, and two ballets. There is also Nabokov's unfilmed and re-edited screenplay, an uncompleted opera based on the work, and an "imagined opera" which combines elements of opera and dance.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about the novel by Vladimir Nabokov. For other uses, see Lolita disambiguation.

For the band, see Clare Quilty group. This article possibly contains original research. Please improve it by verifying the claims made and adding inline citations.

Statements consisting only of original research should be removed. November Learn how and when to remove this template message.

United States portal s portal Novels portal. Retrieved 3 January Retrieved 31 August The word Lolita has, however, strayed from its original referent, and has settled into the language as a term we define as 'a precociously seductive girl.

The definition of Lolita reflects the fact that the word is used in contemporary writing without connotations of victimization.

The Atlantic. Retrieved 8 October Great Soviet encyclopedia. The book of ages. Women's studies: a recommended core bibliography.

Loeb Libraries. Russia: a country study. Sex and Russian society. Indiana University Press. Dangerous pilgrimages: transatlantic mythologies and the novel.

Vladimir Nabokov, a reference guide. Lolita: a Janus text. Twayne Publishers. Philosophy and Literature. The Paris Review.

Archived from the original on 19 January Retrieved 31 January Longform Media. Archived from the original on 21 January Vladimir Nabokov's Lolita: A casebook.

Vladimir Nabokov, Lolita: A reader's guide to essential criticism. Cambridge: Icon Books. The Times. Archived from the original on 15 June The New York Times.

Over her dead body: death, femininity and the aesthetic. Manchester University Press. Retrieved 2 October Retrieved 30 January However, when he returns to pick her up, she is gone.

The nurse there tells him she left with another man claiming to be her uncle and Humbert, devastated, is left without a single clue as to her disappearance or whereabouts.

Some years later, Humbert receives a letter from Mrs. Richard T. Schiller, Lolita's married name.

She writes that she is now married to a man named Dick, and that she is pregnant and in desperate need of money.

Humbert travels to their home and finds that she is now a roundly expectant woman in glasses leading a pleasant, humdrum life.

Humbert demands that she tell him who kidnapped her three years earlier. She tells him it was Clare Quilty, the man that was following them, who is a famous playwright and with whom her mother had a fling in Ramsdale days.

She states Quilty is also the one who disguised himself as Dr. Zempf, the pushy stranger who kept crossing their path. Lolita herself carried on an affair with him and left with him when he promised her glamour.

However, he then demanded she join his depraved lifestyle, including acting in his "art" films, which she vehemently refused.

Humbert begs Lolita to leave her husband and come away with him, but she declines. The epilogue explains that Humbert died of coronary thrombosis awaiting trial for Quilty's murder.

With Nabokov's consent, Kubrick changed the order in which events unfolded by moving what was the novel's ending to the start of the film, a literary device known as in medias res.

Kubrick determined that while this sacrificed a great ending, it helped maintain interest, as he believed that interest in the novel sagged halfway through once Humbert was successful in seducing Lolita.

The second half contains an odyssey across the United States and though the novel was set in the s, Kubrick gave it a contemporary setting, shooting many of the exterior scenes in England with some back-projected scenery shot in the United States, including upstate eastern New York, along NY 9N in the eastern Adirondacks and a hilltop view of Albany from Rensselaer , on the east bank of the Hudson.

Kubrick had to film in England, as much of the money to finance the movie was not only raised there but also had to be spent there. Mason was the first choice of Kubrick and producer Harris for the role of Humbert Humbert, but he initially declined due to a Broadway engagement while recommending his daughter, Portland , for the role of Lolita.

Kubrick considered Peter Ustinov but decided against him. Harris then suggested David Niven ; Niven accepted the part but then withdrew for fear the sponsors of his TV show, Four Star Playhouse , would object.

Mason then withdrew from his play and got the part. The role of Clare Quilty was greatly expanded from that in the novel and Kubrick allowed Sellers to adopt a variety of disguises throughout the film.

Early on in the film, Quilty appears as himself: a conceited, avant-garde playwright with a superior manner. Later he is an inquisitive policeman on the porch of the hotel, where Humbert and Lolita are staying.

Next he is the intrusive Beardsley High School psychologist, Doctor Zempf, who lurks in Humbert's front room, to persuade him to give Lolita more freedom in her after-school activities.

Later in the film, he is an anonymous phone caller conducting a survey. Jill Haworth was asked to take the role of Lolita but she was under contract to Otto Preminger and he said "no.

At the time the film was released, the ratings system was not in effect and the Hays Code , dating back to the s, governed movie production.

The censorship of the time inhibited Kubrick's direction; Kubrick later commented that, "because of all the pressure over the Production Code and the Catholic Legion of Decency at the time, I believe I didn't sufficiently dramatize the erotic aspect of Humbert's relationship with Lolita.

If I could do the film over again, I would have stressed the erotic component of their relationship with the same weight Nabokov did. In a Newsweek interview after the ratings system had been introduced in late , Kubrick said that he "probably wouldn't have made the film" had he realized in advance how difficult the censorship problems would be.

The film is deliberately vague over Lolita's age. Kubrick commented, "I think that some people had the mental picture of a nine-year-old, but Lolita was twelve and a half in the book; Sue Lyon was thirteen.

Humbert uses the term "nymphet" to describe Lolita, which he explains and uses in the novel; it appears twice in the movie and its meaning is left undefined.

I know it is madness to keep this journal, but it gives me a strange thrill to do so. And only a loving wife could decipher my microscopic script.

The adaptation of the screenplay is credited to Nabokov, although very little of what he provided later published in a shortened version was used in the film itself.

Nabokov, following the success of the novel, moved out to Hollywood and penned a script for a film adaptation between March and September The first draft was extremely long—over pages, to which producer Harris remarked "You couldn't make it.

You couldn't lift it". There are many differences between the Kubrick-Harris film adaptation and Nabokov's novel, including some events that were entirely omitted.

Most of the sexually explicit innuendos , references and episodes in the book were taken out of the film because of the strict censorship of the s; the sexual relationship between Lolita and Humbert is implied and never depicted graphically on the screen.

In addition, some events in the film differ from the novel, and there are also changes in Lolita's character. Some of the differences are listed below:.

Lolita's age was raised from 12 to early teens in the film to meet MPAA standards. Kubrick had been warned that censors felt strongly about using a more physically developed actress, who would be seen to be at least As such, Sue Lyon was chosen for the title role, partly due to her more mature appearance.

The name "Lolita" is used only by Humbert as a private pet nickname in the novel, whereas in the film several of the characters refer to her by that name.

In the book, she is referred to simply as "Lo" or "Lola" or "Dolly" by the other characters. Various critics, such as Susan Sweeney, have observed that since she never calls herself "Lolita", Humbert's pet name denies her subjectivity.

The film is not especially focused on Lolita's feelings. In the medium of film, her character is inevitably fleshed out somewhat from the cipher that she remains in the novel.

Nonetheless, Kubrick actually omits the few vignettes in the novel in which Humbert's solipsistic bubble is burst and one catches glimpses of Lolita's personal misery.

Susan Bordo writes, "Kubrick chose not to include any of the vignettes from the novel which bring Lolita's misery to the forefront, nudging Humbert's obsession temporarily off center-stage.

Nabokov's wife, Vera, insisted—rightly—on 'the pathos of Lolita's utter loneliness. In Kubrick's film, one good sobfest and dead mommy is forgotten.

Humbert, to calm her down, has promised her a brand-new hi-fi and all the latest records. The same scene in the novel ends with Lolita sobbing, despite Humbert having plied her with gifts all day.

Critic Greg Jenkins believes that Humbert is imbued with a fundamental likability in this film that he does not necessarily have in the novel.

Humbert's two mental breakdowns leading to sanatorium stays before meeting Lolita are entirely omitted in the film, as are his earlier unsuccessful relationships with women his own age whom he refers to in the novel as "terrestrial women" through which he tried to stabilize himself.

His lifelong complexes around young girls are largely concealed in the film, and Lolita appears older than her novelistic counterpart, both leading Jenkins to comment "A story originally told from the edge of a moral abyss is fast moving toward safer ground.

Jenkins notes that Humbert even seems a bit more dignified and restrained than other residents of Ramsdale, particularly Lolita's aggressive mother, in a way that invites the audience to sympathize with Humbert.

Humbert is portrayed as someone urbane and sophisticated trapped in a provincial small town populated by slightly lecherous people, a refugee from Old World Europe in an especially crass part of the New World.

For example, Lolita's piano teacher comes across in the film as aggressive and predatory compared to which Humbert seems fairly restrained.

Jenkins believes that in the film it is Quilty, not Humbert, who acts as the embodiment of evil. Because Humbert narrates the novel, his increased mental deterioration due to anxiety in the entire second half of the story is more obvious from the increasingly desperate tone of his narrative.

While the film shows Humbert's increasingly severe attempts to control Lolita, the novel shows more of Humbert's loss of self-control and stability.

Jenkins also notes that some of Humbert's more brutal actions are omitted or changed from the film. For example, in the novel he threatens to send Lolita to a reformatory, while in the film he promises to never send her there.

The film entirely omits the critical episode in Humbert's life in which at age 14 he was interrupted making love to young Annabel Leigh who shortly thereafter died, and consequently omits all indications that Humbert had a preoccupation with prepubescent girls prior to meeting Dolores Haze.

In the novel, Humbert gives his youthful amorous relationship with Annabel Leigh, thwarted by both adult intervention and her death, as the key to his obsession with nymphets.

The film's only mention of "nymphets" is an entry in Humbert's diary specifically revolving around Lolita. Humbert explains that the smell and taste of youth filled his desires throughout adulthood: "that little girl with her seaside limbs and ardent tongue haunted [him] ever since".

The idea that anything connected with young girls motivated Humbert to accept the job as professor of French Literature at Beardsley College and move to Ramsdale at all is entirely omitted from the film.

In the novel he first finds accommodations with the McCoo family because the McCoos have a twelve-year-old daughter, a potential "enigmatic nymphet whom [he] would coach in French and fondle in Humbertish.

Haze offers to accommodate Humbert. Susan Bordo has noticed that in order to show the callous and cruel side of Humbert's personality early in the film, Nabokov and Kubrick have shown additional ways in which Humbert behaves monstrously towards her mother, Charlotte Haze.

He mocks her declaration of love towards him, and takes a pleasant bath after her accidental death. This effectively replaces the voice-overs in which he discusses his plans to seduce and molest Lolita as a means of establishing Humbert as manipulative, scheming, and selfish.

Quilty's role is greatly magnified in the film and brought into the foreground of the narrative.

In the novel Humbert catches only brief uncomprehending glimpses of his nemesis before their final confrontation at Quilty's home, and the reader finds out about Quilty late in the narrative along with Humbert.

Quilty's role in the story is made fully explicit from the beginning of the film, rather than being a concealed surprise twist near the end of the tale.

In a interview with Terry Southern , Kubrick describes his decision to expand Quilty's role, saying "just beneath the surface of the story was this strong secondary narrative thread possible—because after Humbert seduces her in the motel, or rather after she seduces him, the big question has been answered—so it was good to have this narrative of mystery continuing after the seduction.

The film opens with a scene near the end of the story, Humbert's murder of Quilty. This means that the film shows Humbert as a murderer before showing us Humbert as a seducer of minors, and the film sets up the viewer to frame the following flashback as an explanation for the murder.

The film then goes back to Humbert's first meeting with Charlotte Haze and continues chronologically until the final murder scene is presented once again.

The book, narrated by Humbert, presents events in chronological order from the very beginning, opening with Humbert's life as a child.

While Humbert hints throughout the novel that he has committed murder, its actual circumstances are not described until near the very end. NPR's Bret Anthony Johnston notes that the novel is sort of an inverted murder mystery: the reader knows someone has been killed, but the reader has to wait to find out who the victim is.

In the novel, Miss Pratt, the school principal at Beardsley, discusses with Humbert Dolores's behavioral issues and among other things persuades Humbert to allow her to participate in the dramatics group, especially one upcoming play.

In the film, this role is replaced by Quilty disguised as a school psychologist named "Dr. This disguise does not appear in the novel at all.

In both versions, a claim is made that Lolita appears to be "sexually repressed", as she mysteriously has no interest in boys.

Both Dr. Zempf and Miss Pratt express the opinion that this aspect of her youth should be developed and stimulated by dating and participating in the school's social activities.

While Pratt mostly wants Humbert to let Dolores generally into the dramatic group, Quilty as Zempf is specifically focused on the high school play written by Quilty and produced with some supervision from him which Lolita had secretly rehearsed for in both the film and novel.

Although Peter Sellers is playing only one character in this film, Quilty's disguise as Dr. Zempf allows him to employ a mock German accent that is quintessentially in the style of Sellers's acting.

With regard to this scene, playwright Edward Albee 's stage adaptation of the novel follows Kubrick's film rather than the novel.

The movie retains the novel's theme of Quilty anonymously goading Humbert's conscience on many occasions, though the details of how this theme is played out are quite different in the film.

He has been described as "an emanation of Humbert's guilty conscience", [32] and Humbert describes Quilty in the novel as his "shadow".

The first and last word of the novel is "Lolita". In the novel, Humbert and Charlotte go swimming in Hourglass Lake, where Charlotte announces she will ship Lo off to a good boarding school; that part takes place in bed in the film.

Humbert's contemplation of possibly killing Charlotte similarly takes place at Hourglass Lake in the book, but at home in the film.

This difference affects Humbert's contemplated method of killing Charlotte. In the book he is tempted to drown her in the lake, whereas in the film he considers the possibility of shooting her with a pistol while in the house, in both scenarios concluding that he could never bring himself to do it.

In his biography of Kubrick, Vincent LoBrutto notes that Kubrick tried to recreate Hourglass Lake in a studio, but became uncomfortable shooting such a pivotally important exterior scene in the studio, so he refashioned the scene to take place at home.

In the novel Humbert really considers killing Charlotte and later Lolita accuses Humbert of having deliberately killed her.

Only the first scene is in the film and only the latter scene appears in the film. Lolita's friend, Mona Dahl, is a friend in Ramsdale the first half of the story in the film and disappears quite early in the story.

In the film, Mona is simply the host of a party which Lolita abandons early in the story. Mona is a friend of Lolita's in Beardsley the second half of the story in the novel.

In the novel Mona is active in the school play, Lolita tells Humbert stories about Mona's love life, and Humbert notes Mona had "long since ceased" to be if ever she was a "nymphet.

She keeps Lolita's secrets and helps Lolita lie to Humbert when Humbert discovers that Lolita has been missing her piano lessons.

In the film, Mona in the second half seems to have been replaced by a "Michele" who is also in the play and having an affair with a Marine and backs up Lolita's fibs to Humbert.

Film critic Greg Jenkins claims that Mona has simply been entirely eliminated from the film. Humbert is suspicious that Lolita is developing an interest in boys at various times throughout the story.

He suspects no one in particular in the novel. In the film, he is twice suspicious of a pair of boys, Rex and Roy, who hang out with Lolita and her friend Michele.

In the novel, Mona has a friend named Roy. In the novel, the first mutual attraction between Humbert and Lolita begins because Humbert resembles a celebrity she likes.

In the film, it occurs at a drive-in horror film when she grabs his hand. Christine Lee Gengaro proposes that this suggests that Humbert is a monster in a mask, [39] and the same theory is developed at greater length by Jason Lee.

In the novel, both the hotel at which Humbert and Dolores first have relations and the stage-play by Quilty for which Dolores prepares to perform in at her high school is called The Enchanted Hunter.

However, in the novel school headmistress Pratt erroneously refers to the play as The Hunted Enchanter. In Kubrick's film, the hotel bears the same name as in the novel, but now the play really is called The Hunted Enchanter.

Both names are established only through signage — the banner for the police convention at the hotel and the marquee for the play — the names are never mentioned in dialogue.

The relationships between Humbert and other women before and after Lolita is omitted from the film. Greg Jenkins sees this as part of Kubrick's general tendency to simplify his narratives, also noting that the novel therefore gives us a more "seasoned" view of Humbert's taste in women.

Only the film has a police convention at the hotel where Humbert allows Lolita to seduce him. Kubrick scholar Michel Ciment sees this as typical of Kubrick's general tendency to assail authority figures.

Film Lolita Inhaltsverzeichnis

In unserem Special präsentieren wir euch Howard Atherton. Mehr erfahren. Deutscher Titel. Stephen Schiff. Die geniale Kamera- und Regiearbeit versteht selbst die realistischsten Ausstattungs- und Einrichtungsgegenstände noch für die von schwarzem Humor bestimmte Illustration eines surrealen Albtraums zu nutzen. Das könnte dich auch interessieren. Während dieser Reise werden sie — wie Salazars Rache später Kind 44 Imdb — von Quilty verfolgt, der es auf Lolita abgesehen hat. Deine E-Mail-Adresse. Film Lolita

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